Wednesday, 28 September 2016

What is Dry Mouth?

What is Dry Mouth?
Dry mouth means you don't have enough saliva, or spit, to keep your mouth moist. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while, especially if you're nervous, upset or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can be uncomfortable and can lead to more serious health problems or indicate that a more serious medical condition may exist. That's because saliva does more than just keep the mouth wet -it helps digest food, protects teeth from decay, prevents infection by controlling bacteria in the mouth, and makes it possible for you to chew and swallow.

There are several reasons that the glands that produce saliva, called the salivary glands, might not function properly. These include:

  • Side effects of some medications - over 400 medicines can cause dry mouth, including antihistamines, decongestants, pain killers, diuretics and medicines for high blood pressure and depression.
  • Disease - diseases that affect the salivary glands, such as diabetes, Hodgkin's, Parkinson's disease, HIV/AIDS and Sjogren's syndrome, may lead to dry mouth.
  • Radiation therapy - the salivary glands can be damaged if your head or neck are exposed to radiation during cancer treatment. The loss of saliva can be total or partial, permanent or temporary.
  • Chemotherapy - drugs used to treat cancer can make saliva thicker, or "ropey," causing your mouth to feel dry.
  • Menopause - changing hormone levels affect the salivary glands, often leaving menopausal and post-menopausal women with a persistent feeling of dry mouth.
  • Smoking - many pipe, cigar and heavy cigarette smokers experience dry mouth.

To read the entire article , please visit Colgate.com

Winterset Dental Care  
8559 South Pulaski Road  
Chicago, IL 60652  
(773) 582-0035  
WintersetFamilyDental.com

Monday, 26 September 2016

Friday, 16 September 2016

Dental Veneers: Pros and Cons

Dental veneers are thin pieces of tooth-colored porcelain cemented to the front surfaces of your natural teeth, and are an easy way to address a variety of physical and aesthetic problems. Because they're also permanent, however, you'll need to carefully weigh the pros and cons of the procedure before you decide to get them. Here are six things to think about and discuss with your dentist.

Pro #1: Easily Whiten Your Smile
Years of drinking coffee, smoking cigarettes or eating highly pigmented foods eventually take their toll on your teeth, turning them an unattractive shade of yellow or brown. Stained enamel can be bleached at home or by your dentist, but it can become stained again. If you're looking for an easier way to whiten your smile for good, dental veneers may be a good fit for you. Veneers are largely stain-resistant, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), so you won't have to worry about discoloration or needing to have your veneers whitened.

To read the entire article written by Jennifer Mitchell , please visit Colgate.com

Winterset Dental Care  
8559 South Pulaski Road  
Chicago, IL 60652  
(773) 582-0035  
WintersetFamilyDental.com

Friday, 9 September 2016

Crowns

A crown is a tooth-shaped cover placed over a tooth that is badly damaged or decayed. Many people call it a cap.
Crowns may be placed for several reasons. Usually the tooth has been broken or severely damaged by decay. As a result, a filling can't replace enough of the tooth or make the tooth strong enough. A crown may hold together parts of a cracked tooth. It also can be used to hold a bridge in place. Crowns can be used to improve appearance as well. They may be placed to cover misshapen or badly discolored teeth.

Crowns can be made ahead of time (prefabricated) or made to order in a laboratory. Prefabricated crowns are made of plastic or stainless steel. They can be used on a temporary basis until a permanent crown is made.

Crowns can be made of:

  • All metal
  • Zirconia
  • Porcelain fused to metal (PFM)
  • Porcelain fused to zirconia
  • All ceramic

Metals include gold alloy, other alloys (palladium) or a base-metal alloy (nickel or chromium). The all-metal or PFM crowns are stronger and are better choices for back teeth than ceramic crowns. PFM and all-ceramic crowns are the same color as your natural teeth. They look just like normal teeth.

To read the entire article , please visit Colgate.com

Winterset Dental Care  
8559 South Pulaski Road  
Chicago, IL 60652  
(773) 582-0035  
WintersetFamilyDental.com

Diet & Your Teeth

Learn more about the connection between your teeth and what you eat.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Winterset Dental Care  
8559 South Pulaski Road  
Chicago, IL 60652  
(773) 582-0035  
WintersetFamilyDental.com

Friday, 2 September 2016

Discolored Teeth: Five Foods that Cause Stains

Proper oral hygiene is of course indispensable for maintaining a bright smile, but there is one other important bit of advice: Watch what you eat and drink. Certain foods and beverages can discolor teeth. If you want to protect your pearly whites, read on for some common culprits that stain your teeth.

Pasta Sauce
Because of their acidity, bright red hue and tendency to cling to the teeth, the tomatoes in pasta sauce can leave your teeth vulnerable to staining. Dine on some dark green veggies, such as broccoli, kale and spinach, beforehand to create a protective film over the teeth. The film will ward off tomatoes' staining effect, so spring for a green salad as an appetizer.

Curry
Curry, a spice that works well in Indian food and exotic dishes, is also a cause of discolored teeth. Its deep pigmentation can yellow teeth over time. Due to its high staining factor, curry is something you may want to limit in your diet. Whenever you dine on curry-spiced food, mix in fresh fruits and vegetables that prevent stains, such as apples, carrots, cauliflower and celery.

To read the entire article written by Margie Monin Dombrowski , please visit Colgate.com

Winterset Dental Care  
8559 South Pulaski Road  
Chicago, IL 60652  
(773) 582-0035  
WintersetFamilyDental.com

Lifestyle & Your Oral Health

Learn more about how your lifestyle can affect your oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Winterset Dental Care  
8559 South Pulaski Road  
Chicago, IL 60652  
(773) 582-0035  
WintersetFamilyDental.com